At A Glance: Recent Winter Containers

SC winter 2014  2A lot of work has been done this past week.  Seeing this group of pictures, I am pleased that each one has a presence all its own. In showing the draft of this post to Rob, he asked me to click on the first picture, which opens that picture in a larger format, with the added option of viewing the pictures as a slide show. I had no idea-did you?

recent work (22)

DSC_6963

 

ML winter 2014  9

PO winter 2014  4

recent work (1)

recent work (9)

recent work (21)

JB winter 2014  9

recent work (16)

ML 2014 winter 2

recent work (2)

lighted winter potsrecent work (17)

recent work (12)

recent work (8)

DSC_6971

LTP winter 2014  3

JRH winter 2014  2

JD winter 2014  4

JD winter 2014  2

EG winter 2014  2

 

One Stem At A Time

LH winter 2014 (1)Some winter containers ask for a centerpiece. Small containers may not have room for lots of materials in them, stuck one stem at a time. A centerpiece only occupies a few inches of space in a container – the bamboo pole and all that is attached to it, driven down into the soil, provides all of the structural support.  Some containers ask for height in the center.  A structured centerpiece is a more formal arrangement, as it is visually stable and symmetrical. The centerpieces pictured above were set in a pair of antique French champagne grape crates for safe keeping only, once they were finished. The pots they were destined for are square, and formal.  The placement on a front porch asks for enough height to be seen from the drive.  As for these rectangular crates, they ask for an entirely different construction approach. More on the crates later next week. I like to call this alternative construction the Rob technique.  Every winter and holiday container that he does for a client is deconstructed.  His design evolves, one stem at a time.

LH winter 2014 (2)My client with the formal square pots also has a pair of rectangular pots.  All four are Jackie boxes, made at our company Branch.  A centerpiece in a long box can look awkward and lonely. This client had a particular requirement for white, and light in the containers. We did the greens on the edges of the foam forms, loosely.  All of the other materials would have to be inserted into the foam, one stem at a time.  If a container arrangement asks for a one at a time treatment, the foam in the center may be three pieces thick.  Creativity – we prize that individual expression.  But the most creative work on the planet comes to no good if it goes over.  As Buck would say, the approach to the work is important.

LH winter 2014 (3)
The center section of this rectangular form was dressed with a strand of garland lights.  Garland lights are spaced very close together on the wire.  One string has 300 lights.  The lights are pinned into place with fern pins.  A large rectangular planter asks for light which is dispersed all along its length, and strong enough to light from below all of the materials that come next. Back and forth-the light string gets set.  The tallest of the stems are stuck deep enough into the foam layers to be stable, and in a roughly formal pattern.

LH winter 2014 (6)Once the lights are pinned to the foam, we turn them on for the entire duration of the construction.  It is important to see how all of the other materials will relate to that light.  For these containers, I stuck white eucalyptus and white leptospermum at different heights.  One stem at a time.  Any project that happens one gesture at a time takes the time it takes to think every gesture through.  No matter how busy we are, Rob takes the time a project needs to be beautiful.  He is an inspiration to me.     LH winter 2014 (8)Constructing a winter container in the privacy of our garage means we can rfethink, fuss, adjust, and rearrange to our heart’s content, before we go live.

LH winter 2014 (15)Once we get to the installation phase, we are done with the creative decisions.  We just mean to install with many months of faithful service in mind.  This arrangement is secured into the soil with pairs of long steel rebar, set at an angle.  The rebar functions as roots. These natural materials are cut. We need to provide for the rooting a live plant will do naturally.

LH winter 2014 (12)The finished container is stuffed with materials that will see the winter through.  Each stem, stuck one at a time.  These clients have an extraordinary appreciation and interest in the landscape.  How I appreciate that they called on me.

LH winter 2014 (13)The smaller square boxes represent strongly – the centrally constructed centerpieces stand behind that formal statement.  Good design takes so many factors into account. Successful design requires the meeting of so many minds.  The client, first and foremost.  The architecture. The space.  The light.

LH winter 2014 (23)I encourage all of my clients to identify materials that appeal to them.  I can plan around an idea.  If you are your own client, take the time to ask the big questions before you set to the task. What do you like?  What you like will greatly inform how you represent the winter season.  There is no need to quit the garden, given the first really hard frost. There is only a need to switch gears a bit.  Michigan has 6 months of winter-we are just beginning to express our rebuttal.

LH winter 2014 (24)These boxes are dressed for the winter. Just how I envisioned them.  I have heard that my client likes them.  I am sure the light in the boxes at night will welcome friends and family.  Whatever manner you choose to envision and decorate your winter landscape-please persist. Great joy accompanies great ideas.

 

Freezing Weather

holiday containers 2014 (5)Our recent weather has been much more like January than November.  Day time temperatures the the 20’s, and night temperatures in the low teens does not mean we postpone our winter container work. Even if we could, there isn’t any need. If the prospect of doing winter container arrangements is leaving you cold, perhaps some of our techniques might help make it more satisfying.  Trying to create is tough when one’s fingers and toes are numb. Most of our construction is done indoors-in our garage. Any enclosed space will be a more comfortable environment in which to to work, even if it isn’t heated much. When we do go outdoors, it is for active work-the installation part.

holiday containers 2014 (6)Some of our centerpieces are constructed ahead of the installation time.  A very stout bamboo stake is at the center of every centerpiece.  All of the other materials are arranged around that stake.  Sometimes a good quality rubber band helps to keep the materials in place until you get everything arranged exactly as you wish.  For large and heavy materials, a loose zip tie will do the trick.  For very heavy materials, another pair of hands is best.  Once all of the materials are arranged to suit, we tighten the zip ties with a pair of piers.  Very bulky and heavy materials are secured with concrete wire. A centerpiece may have multiple components or layers.

holiday containers 2014 (7)We construct forms for our greens from dry floral foam.  We glue two layers together for added strength. All of our premium greens are in the range of 18″ long, and are fairly weighty.  Large scale pots may ask for that entire width over the edge in order to look properly proportioned. We can get 2 lengths of greens from one long bough for smaller pots. For pots larger than 36″ in diameter, we usually glue the foam form to a piece of 1/2 inch thick exterior plywood for added support.  The winter pots need to look good over a long period of time in which the weather can bring high winds and heavy snow. Nothing is more miserable than trying to repair a winter container arrangement gone over in mid January or February.  The foam form is secured to the soil in the pot in two ways.  We remove the top 4 inches of soil, so the lower level of foam fits down into the container. The upper level holds all of the boughs.  We sharpen the stems of the greens, for a tight fit.  We then drive rebar through the foam and greens into the soil, and wire the steel posts together. The hole you see in the center of the foam-a place for the centerpiece.  Foam forms do not have to be exact.  They are an armature giving support and flexibility to the finished arrangement.

holiday containers 2014 (8)All that remains to add to the centerpieces on site are those finishing materials that gives each winter container a distinct and unique look. Very contemporary winter pots may be as simple as a mass of twigs set into cut greens. There are plenty of other materials available, should you want a softer look.  These winter pots have sinamay (also known as poly mesh), bleached pine cones, pale gold holiday picks, and mini vine rolls. Rob does a great job of sourcing a wide variety of materials that can find their way into winter pots. He likes giving every gardener lots of choices. We have a long winter ahead.holiday containers 2014 (3)All of these accessory materials are either wired to the greens, or wedged into the stick stack.  All of these materials will be fine outdoors over a winter. Does this process seem like much too much work?  It isn’t really-as the process from raw materials to finished container is not only fun, but doable.  Any gardener can do winter pots for themselves.

First National 2014 (1)
In composing a winter pot, keep in mind that you are without that miracle we know as growing. The winter pots are the same size and scale on the last day of winter as they are on the first. Eucalyptus is bulky-a single bunch will go a long way.  If your container is large, consider 2.  If you want to feature this material, go to three bunches, and use fewer fresh cut twigs.  Sinamay is a synthetic mesh that when rouched like smocking, will occupy lots of space.  No amount of snow will distort the shape you create from the beginning.  I brush the snow off my sinamay at home when the snow threatens to bury it. Curly Grapevine rolls create a lot of volume from not much material.  These mini vine rolls are perfect for adding an airy layer of interest to this pot.

First National 2014 (2)The materials in these pots are subtly colored, but are of a volume proportional to the size of the pot.  The centerpieces is red bud pussy willow, in a 5-6 foot height.  Some pots need a tall element. Branches are graded by height, so the height you need is the height you get.    The fresh cut natural branch sets the stage for the character of all of the other elements.

First National 2014 (3)Though the pots are 36″ tall, and 36″ in diameter, the arrangement is graceful.  Each pot is different, as they are done by hand.  Done by hand can endow anything you with a certain feeling.  Containers imagined and arranged by gardeners have that hand made look. The evidence of the human hand is always attracts my attention and interest.

holiday containers 2014 (4)These pots could stand as is until the spring.  I don’t mind a little sparkle during the winter.  Alternately, they would work just as well, if the sinamay and pale gold sparkle picks came out after New Years.
holiday containers 2014 (2)These very large containers have enough variation in materials to provide some interest, even though the color palette is subdued.

holiday containers downtown 2014The steel gray color of the pots was an important consideration in the selection of the materials.

holiday containers 2014 (1)Few things pain me more than pots sitting empty over the winter. Pots full of this or that, enduring over the course of the winter, speak to the hope that grounds every gardener.  The garden goes on all year round, does it not?  Some seasons, the forms and available materials are different. No reason not to celebrate, whatever the weather.

The Center Of Interest: A Short Story

red-twig-dogwood.jpgOne way to organize a creative winter garden expression is to decide on a center of interest, and design every other element to celebrate that one big idea.  If you have a mind that your winter pot needs a centerpiece, I have some suggestions about the construction.  Let’s assume that you have built a foam form, and stick all of your greens to your satisfaction.  That foam form should have a hole in the middle, close to the diameter of the centerpiece you have in mind.  Sometimes we make that hole smaller, and cut the actual size during the installation.  A tight fit is a good idea.  We arrange the centerpiece using thick rubber bands to contain every stem.  Rubber bands will oblige, should you decide to add several more stems.  The centerpiece needs a place to be.  A great centerpiece for a winter pot needs some thought about the materials, and the construction.

winter-container.jpgFresh cut twigs are woody, and incredibly strong.  But once they have been cut away from the roots of the plant, they have no plan in place to keep them perfectly vertical in the container.  The center of all of our centerpieces is a stout bamboo stake.  Having done countless winter containers, we have an instinct about how long that stake should be.  Though it is part of the above grade centerpiece assembly, that stake will be pounded down into the soil of the container when it is installed.  The centerpiece needs to have something below ground to keep it vertical.  Bamboo ballast.

winter-container-arrangement.jpgOnce the soil in a pot freezes firmly around that bamboo stake, no winter storm can dislodge that centerpiece.  There are occasions when we add another element or two to the vertical centerpiece.  Some materials get strapped onto the twigs with zip ties or concrete wire.  Some materials are stuck into the foam-in that space between the greens and the twig centerpiece.  There are those times when the overall shape of the container will ask for hand sticking during an installation.  As much as I mean this essay to be of a tutorial sort, there are no formulas.  Given a general guideline, the individual eye and hand has to drive the bus.

winter-container-centerpiece.jpgThe green preserved leptospermum in this centerpiece was wedged into the copper curly willow, and purple preserved eucalyptus.  A third element introduced into a centerpiece can stitch a look together.  This lepto is a great contrast to the sleek and thick willow stems.  The color and texture adds interest to the purple eucalyptus.  The lepto moves this arrangement to another level.

winter-container.jpgA center of interest in a winter container sets the tone.  Said centerpiece will rule the roost.  Loose and asymmetrical centerpieces read like a well worn pair of jeans.  Structured centerpieces that reach for the sky-awesome.  A winter container with no centerpiece -a winter container well on its way to a contemporary expression.  Twigs arranged to represent in the vertical dimension-more formal. Or maybe more contemporary.  A twig centerpiece that fans out-a uniform fan is very formal.  Restrained.  A loose fan breathes, and chats up a storm.

winter-centerpiece.jpgNo matter what elements you plan to include in your centerpiece, a strong construction will reward you the entire season long.  Strong in, strong out.  Invest in some zip ties, if concrete wire and pliers are not your style.

winter-centerpiece.jpgEvery move you make in the construction of a winter container has visual meaning.  What you construct behind the scenes-I am in favor of a very strong construction.  What you construct behind the scenes also makes a visual statement.  Be clear about what you wish to say.  The time and pleasure that you take to express your idea of winter-everyone will appreciate that.

winter-container.jpgwinter container

winter-container-arrangement.jpgwinter container

pots-for-winter.jpgpots dressed for the winter.