At A Glance: A Run Of Cold And Rainy Weather

August 16 2014 020We have had a long run of cold and rainy weather.  As in overnight temperatures in the high 40′s and low fifties, and close to 6 inches in one day, last week.  I don’t think the pink fittonia has grown an inch.

August 16 2014 047However, this variegated tradescantia is really thriving-the color is so beautiful. It almost looks like it is blooming.  I will plant this again, no doubt.

August 16 2014 002The begonias have held up amazingly well in the cold rainy weather.  The caladiums and alocasia are so so-I would guess they are shuddering from the cold.

Aug 16 2014 004The Persian Shield on this north wall is such a beautiful iridescent purple. In full sun, the leaves green up-the resulting purple/green mix is a muddy color. This pot is holding its own.  I have had the Persian Shields grow 3 feet in a single season.  Not this year.

Aug 16 2014 002This lavender New Guinea impatiens is completely out of bloom, but is setting buds. They hate chilly weather.

Aug 16 2014 003The nicotiana has had quite a bout with white fly. I can’t remember ever dealing with that before.  I sprayed the foliage with water every day.  Who knows if that helped.  The cold may have slowed them down.  I don’t see them anymore, but the nicotiana were damaged. The coleus is filling in for them.

Aug 16 2014 013The plants in this pot seems to be thriving.

Aug 16 2014 005The cool and rainy weather has not fazed the heuchera one bit. They have put on some weight.  Aug 16 2014 007The geraniums have not been happy.  They like it hot, and on the dry side.  But these Caliente geraniums are bravely budding up.  It is hard to keep a good plant down.

Aug 16 2014 009The scented geranium topiary is shedding interior leaves.  This is a sign of water stress-either too much, or too little.  The scotch moss is loving the sun, the rain, and the cool.

Aug 16 2014 010I have no complaints with the Italian olive jar.  Every plant is bearing up, in spite of the unseasonably wet and cold weather.

Aug 16 2014 012Container plantings are a joy, and a trial.  Our summer has been cold and cool-no tropical plant loves this.  I keep hoping for that warm up that never comes. By this time of year, my deck pots are usually overflowing.  Do I have any complaints?  Not really.

014I could be looking at this.

 

 

 

 

 

Out Of Sight, Out Of Mind

August 16 2014 016I have searched the picture files of my home garden in vain for a recent picture from just this angle.  I have plenty of pictures of the ferns on the lower level, the staircase to the rose garden, the boxwood flanking the stairs, and the fountain.  But nothing regarding how this change of level was handled.   I suspect I have no pictures, as that change had stopped working.  I had stopped seeing it.

July 20 2013 (29)From the upper level, the dark mass behind the boxwood hedge and lilac on standard was a row of yews-taxus densiformis.  Those yews were the lower part of a green wall that defined the upper level garden as visually separate from the lower level.  The Princeton Gold maples shielded the view from one garden to the other on the upper level.  I am not sure how long those yews have been there, but I am guessing 15 years anyway. They were a plain dark green backdrop for all else that was planted from both sides.  Gardeners can be timid about dividing or walling off their landscape spaces.  I see lots of landscapes that line up along the periphery of a property, but fewer that describe or make a statement about the interior spaces.

new-retaining-wall.jpgI do have pictures of that upper wall from the year 2000. It had just been finished.  The Palabin lilacs on standard which were there when I bought the house were baby lilacs on standard.  Still there was a considerably hilly drop to the lower level.

adding-another-wall.jpgTwo years later I added a second terrace.  The lower level would be flat and navigable, as would be the upper level.  The 1.5 inch caliper Princeton Gold maples were planted ahead of the construction of the lower wall. It was easier to roll the trees up to that level on a ball cart, as opposed to heaving them over a newly installed wall.

landscape-and-pool.jpgThe boxwood got planted, the arborvitae on the upper level were growing away, and the fountain pool was under construction.  Yet, I have no pictures of the yews that I planted on the edge of the upper level.

August 16 2014 003It was just 2 weeks ago that I took a good look at those yews.  While they were pleasantly green from the upper level, they were bare twigs and tufts of green at the top from the lower level.  As a stop gap measure, I planted a row of liriope spicata, in the hopes they would cover those bare legs. It took but a short while longer to realize that the liriope would languish in the intense shade, and I would still be looking at sticks.  The yews had become too big, and worse yet, they were not a good candidate for renovation.  The maples had grown considerably, and shaded the entire area.  By this time I was more focused on this spot than I had ever been. It did not take long to dig those yews out.

August 16 2014 004The light that came through once the yews were gone was considerable.  Seeing into the upper garden from the lower was a shock-but a pleasant shock. As a landscape ages, it changes-that’s obvious.  It’s the devil to predict how and when a garden will ask for a little renovation.  But I can say having those yews gone was a breath of fresh air. For the first time in many years I am looking at some bare dirt in my landscape.  What now?  I am certain I do not want to plant back anything that will grow tall.  I like the glimpses I am getting of the upper garden.  It could be that any change from what once was will be welcomed.

August 16 2014 006These ferns and European ginger on the south side of the stairs will benefit from the additional light.  Both of these plants tolerate quite a bit of shade, but they will thrive with more light. The view of the neighbor’s fence behind an old arborvitae that has shed its lower branches is not so swell.

August 16 2014 013It seems like I have a chance here to create a new intermediary garden, between the two older ones.  Milo went right to this spot first thing when he got home Friday.  We are both looking at it with fresh eyes.

Off The Beaten Track

pot-in-the-lawn.jpgEvery gardener is used to seeing containers placed on hard surfaces.   On either side of a front porch.  On a set of steps or walkway.  On a terrace. But containers can fit right into a spot in the landscape.  We have worked in several places this week where containers were placed in the midst of the ongoing landscape. I like what I am seeing. Placing pots in the garden is an unusual placement, but unusual can be a good. The first rule of good design is to not take any rule as set in stone.  Some of the most beautiful landscape designs I have seen break every rule.  By this I mean, they break every rule, but do it convincingly.  A great heart, and sure hand always trumps following the rules. I worried myself for days, given the decision to place this pot in the middle of the lawn in the rose garden.  Once the deed was done, I wondered why. The placement seemed right.

pot-in-the-garden.jpgThis container is set in a landscape bed.  A clematis has climbed and wound itself around a tall steel container.  A bed of pachysandra, angelina and hens and chicks has been inter planted with with Persian Queen geraniums, euphorbia, and trailing annual verbena. The look of this garden is better than good. I like how the introduction of annual plants into the landscape, and the perennial clematis climbing the side of a container have created a look in which the container has become an integral part of the landscape. The annuals planted in ground-so charming, and so successful. This planting is not mine-it is all Jane’s.  Clients can be a great source of inspiration. They know their gardens backwards and forwards.  Their decisions are based on a daily exposure. This corner is invariably burned by salt in the winter, so a summer/seasonal planting helps keep this spot luxuriant.lemon-cypress.jpgA container set in a landscape bed is one way to create a focal point.  This tall concrete pot planted with a lemon cypress, euphorbia, and petunias gives meaning to a landscape comprised of arborvitae and pachysandra.  I like the ground cover growing up over the base of this planter. It looks as though the container has been there a while, and belongs there. in-the-garden.jpgA pot gracefully placed in a landscape can add another dimension to an outdoor space. Landscapes which offer many dimensions continue to interest the viewer.  A pot placed in the landscape is a mark made by a designer.  That said, I treasure the individual statement of a landscape above all. Some landscapes I see are all about a gardener in charge with a strong point of view.

Chicago-figs.jpgWe usually remove the grass underneath a container, excavate the soil, and replace that soil with gravel.  The insures that the container drains unimpeded. Trimming the grass around the container is an extra step, maybe even a nuisance.  But for the gardener that appreciates the small details, a placement like this is a pleasure. A pot placement in the landscape can be a temporary solution to a bigger problem.  In this case, a tree directly behind this group of containers died this past winter. The tree, and its stump was of a size that replacement will not be easy. The pots draw one’s eye away from the empty space. Given this placement of pots, a much smaller tree could be planted which would eventually fill that void.

shade-pot.jpgA container in the landscape takes on the same sculptural quality as a birdbath, armillary, or sundial.  The small footprint of any of these ornaments makes them easy to tuck into a small space that needs some visual interest.  This client has a particular fondness for pots in her borders. This pot is set on a short concrete plinth.  That small amount of additional height keeps the bottom of the pot in view, despite the ground covering geraniums.

in-the-landscape.jpgThis French glazed pot is of considerable size and stature.  It has been placed in a bed of myrtle facing down a stand of mature trees.  Pink and red mandevilleas growing on a simple trellis made of bamboo stakes makes a considerable statement by late summer. This spot, minus the pot, would be too sleepy looking for this client.  Every gardener wants something different from their garden.

herniaria.jpgThe landscape in the front of my house features two fairly large patches of herniaria.  This spot asked for something short that would require little maintenance-it has done very well there. Years ago I set a pair of French glazed pots at opposite ends. A garden ornament which represents the end, or boundary of a garden is called a Herm, 0r a term-as in terminus.  Though I have since moved the Russian sage in favor of a simpler arrangement, and switched out the French pot for a concrete pot with a yew topiary that can sit in this spot all year round, the idea is the same. The placement of containers can be anywhere there is a need.

 

 

At A Glance: Walkways

gravel-walk.jpggravel walk

walkway along the drivewalk parallel to the drive

stone-walk.jpgstone walkwaystone and gravelgravel and stone

stone slabslimestone slabs

wood-walkway.jpgwood walk

brick-walk.jpgold brick walk

concrete-aggregate-walk.jpgconcrete aggregate walk

walkway and terracegravel walk and terrace combination

stone-walk-and-stairs.jpgblue stone and limestone

gravel-walk.jpggravel walk

stone on the diagonalstone on the diagonal

cobble walkwaycobblestone walk

stone-walk.jpgstone walkway

cobble-walk.jpgrandom flag walk

bluestone-and-granite-walk.jpgblue stone and granite setts

grass walkwaygrass walk